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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> here are the developments we're following this morning on the disaster in japan. president obama is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is p
plant in japan. right now, emergency workers are risking their lives to prevent a complete nuclear meltdown. crews began the first of four helicopter water drops. at the same time, workers on the ground are using a water cannon meant for riots to shoot water directly into one of the reactors. it is a desperate last ditch effort to keep spent nuclear fuel rods from melting. in a potentially troubling sign white steam was again seen rising from three of the reactors. radiation levels at the plant dangerously high. japan's electric company is working desperately to reconnect power at the plant today. meantime, damning reports about the owner of the japanese power plant. accord to the australian, the owner falsified safety data and said in 1989 tokyo electric injected air into the containment vessel of a reactor number one to lower the leak rate and when caught apologized for "dishonest practices." now, abc's martha raddatz with the latest on the last ditch effort to saint planet. >>> 50 workers inside the plant working in the dark with nothing but flash lights wearing overalls and hea
coming from japanese officials. >> events unfeeling in japan incident appears to be more serious than three-mile island. to what extent, we don't know now and as they're unfolding rapidly on an hour-by-hour, day- by-day basis and there are conflicting reports, so we don't know what is happening. >> reporter: at the white house, questions surveyed about the japanese government's honesty in dealing with the crisis and who americans should listen to. >> when there is a situation when our advice on what to do in reaction to this incident to protect your physical safety, if first from the advice the government of japan is giving, we'll give separate and additional advice to american citizens in japan. >> reporter: millions are struggling still with no electricity, little food, water or heat and in frigid temperatures, rescuers are trying to find survivors five days later, followed by a tsunamina thaswallowed entire towns, survivors are being found. >> chances of survival are small but we're doing our best. >> reporter: and foreigners are continueing to evacuate japan tonight. the death tol
the every-changing situation in japan. we'll have live updates on "america this morning" and later on "good morning america." also stay up to date any time at abcnews.com. >>> moving on to other news beginning with libya. four "new york times" journalists who have been covering the fighting there are now missing. pull its zero prize winning reporter anthony shadid, stephen farrell and photographers tyler hicks and linsey add dario were last heard from on tuesday. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's forces have been battling rebels in a key city in eastern libya. there could be a vote today in the u.n. security council on whether to impose a no-fly zone over libya. >>> meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton was in cairo talking through an unscheduled stroll -- taking an unscheduled stroll through tahrir square, the symbolic center of egypt's revolution. she urged egyptians to not let extremists ruin what they've already accomplished. clinton saying she will not stay on as the nation's top diplomat if president obama is re-elected. she also says she has no interest in another run for the whit
. >> darya: in japan workers are trying to cool the plant where they were evacuated today after smoke rose from the damaged reactor. the cause of the smoke is unclear, the agency says the operator of the complex repeatedly had failed to be crucial inspections of equipment. in the weeks before that the plant was crippled by the earthquake in tsunami. workers have tried to spray the reactors with concrete. one of the several efforts to curb their release. instead of spreading water they are to bring concrete. it would only come into play if water does not cool the reactor spirit this is the latest we do we have. after week of blowing from the no west, when have now shifted threatening to blow radiation to more populated areas to the south. the pattern with the winds blowing from the north east through much of japan is expected to continue through tomorrow. that could carry material on shore from the facility, 150 mi. north of tokyo. >> reporter: monitoring some live pictures at of rockville md.. this is the commission meeting right now one of the things, that they came up with so far is that
this morning of some of the aftermath of the tsunami in japan. you can see the flooding and fighters. let me show you a couple of other pictures. this is from china. look at the floating vehicles submerged and the flooded streets in the miyagi region of japan. this is what it was like for people in a bookstore in a japanese city as the ceiling started to fall in the aftermath of the earthquake. big, international story affecting millions of people on the pacific rim and lots of news coverage will be coming out as the death tolls become clear and also the damage. we are going to talk national politics today and we want to move to wisconsin. with the union vote in the assembly, the legislation is now sent to the governor for a signature. a reporter for "the wisconsin state journal" is on the phone with us. tell us about what the mood was like inside the chamber as the legislation passed. guest: hostile. there was about an hour or two of debate yesterday. the republicans called off debate and voted as they filed out of the chamber. their democratic colleagues, along with some protesters shouted
countries? if there is any other country i would move to, it would be japan because they are such a great country. i want to say that we do not need to by our friends via financial aid. this is ridiculous. host: we do not need to by our friends. guest: is a matter of developing or alliances, working together in the interest of the united states of america. in haiti, when there is poverty and people do not have homes or a place to live, it is not a matter of buying our friends but to make sure we can bring stability in the country because they are right on our border. the same thing with mexico. people travel everywhere and we are all interconnected. i hope that in addition to suppor >> in about 20 minutes we will take you live to the white house for a news conference with president obama. among the possible topics, libya and the impact of the sue tsunan the west coast. live coverage when it starts, scheduled now for 12:30 eastern, and can we'll have that here on c-span2. a new member of congress, kevin yoder, a freshman representative from kansas who also sits on the gop's appropriations
come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. a lot of it is, i feel compelled to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a really race. -- relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence to rivera and you were fantastic. " -- who were there and who worked fantast
and tsunami story. the associated press has just announced and msnbc has tweeted that japan is issuing an evacuation order to thousands of residents near a nuclear power plant. certainly, we will keep an eye on this. we will keep an eye on breaking news. this is a big day for people who are following what is going on in the world. jobs. i pulled the baltimore sun because it is typical of what is going on a run the country. home sales rising. we look at your own on and on the rate in kansas and kansas city and the city itself. what is happening with jobs in your district? against coke the job numbers that you are refering to -- guest: the job numbers that you are referring to -- the economy is probably stronger -- keep tax rates low and below regulatory environment in kansas. we try to foster innovation through small businesses. we try to be very welcome to capital and growth. one of the things we are focused on in the kansas city is bioscience. host: arthur government subsidies supporting that? ? there are research dollars the come to our university. as i said, we are making these redu
point. you recently come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. -- a that is not enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. it costs a lot to send you and a group of people overseas. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence who were there and who were fan
is and the melting nuclear melting in japan shows how perilous our dependence on nuclear power is and they underscore our failure to have a broad based energy portfolio and our failure to have a rational look at our energy usage. mr. russo, - to set prices are determined by supply and demand globally, and several of you have said that sort of thing. let me ask i guess the first mr. newell, what is the scale and let's put it in perspective here of possible short term energy production. i mean, suppose there were a lot more leases for offshore drilling released in the last couple of years to hear the curious oppose or even a in the drilling on private land. what is the scale of the increase in production we might achieve compared to what opec can do by turning defaults up and down in the short term? >> welcome there is a considerable lag in the increased access resources and an expiration and the element and the ultimate protection of the resources so there's an important issue would return to the time scale which i think you mentioned in the short run to respond to the immediate impact send crude oil
attention from the historic changes in the middle east and north africa to the tragedy unfolding in japan. as i often say, we have to deal with both the urgent and the important at the same time. with president obama departing for resilience in just a few hours, -- for brazilia and just a few hours, this is the time to consider another important part of the world. the president's trip coincides with the anniversary of a major milestone in hemispheric relations. 50 years ago, president kennedy launched the alliance for progress, pledging that the united states would join with latin american leaders to address head-on a development challenge that was, as he put it, staggering in its dimensions. he understood that our failure to tackle poverty and inequality in latin america could tear the social fabric and undercut democracy's prospects throughout the hemisphere. president kennedy announced the alliance here in washington to an audience of latin american ambassadors at the white house. president obama will mark this anniversary in latin america. i think that is fitting. too few americans ha
russia, the eu, japan. maybe turkey, maybe saudi arabia. these all will be people who can hip the know sill -- facilitatr and bridge on it. you have to take a role among because you need them to take a position in an agreement perhaps that says we will respect what the afghans have agreed to. we will not intervene. we will treat afghanistan as it wishes to be treated, whether that's neutral or not aligned or some other basis. we will continue to provide them with economic assistance. if a new afghan government needs security help, we will do so. it says in effect that we need peacekeeping perhaps for verification and monitoring. a all though things are part of what we would call the second circle negotiation which fits in and around the first circle negotiation among afghans. >> i think what we saw is that in ten years on, this war, positions have changed and the parties have expressed these different opinions. this general attitude, i think, you know, led us to say, you can build a kind of construction around the word negotiation. >> charlie: here's my question. is this a role model
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)